Shin-Budo Kai

Shin-Budo Kai (SBK) is a national Aikido organization founded by Shizuo Imaizumi, Shihan, in order to teach martial arts concepts and techniques. Literally, the word, shin, may be translated as “true” or “the truth,” but may also refer to “faith,” “heart or spirit,” and “core or marrow.” Budo translates as “the martial Way,” and kai means “association” or “organization.” The meaning of shin, in this context, relates more to the idea of being “true to the original.” It is meant to convey a sense of genuineness as well as a commitment to the “core” or “marrow” of traditional Budo.

Within Shin-Budo Kai, the arts of Aikido, Bokkendo (the way of the wooden sword), Jodo (the way of the short staff), and Genkido (the way of cultivating one’s body, mind and spirit through ki development) are the cornerstones of training. Training in Aikido forms the core, while genkido is foundational across all SBK arts. Practice in the use of the bokken and jo starts in the earliest stages of training.

Albuquerque Shin-Budo Kai

ASBK is a volunteer-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit educational organization dedicated to the instruction of Shin-Budo Kai style Aikido and related arts. The mission of ASBK is to promote and foster the philosophy and arts of Aikido, which is a modern form of Japanese Budo that embraces non-violent approaches to conflict resolution through personal development and self-mastery. This educational mission is guided by the ideals of Budo and the spirit and teachings of Aikido’s founder, Master Morihei Ueshiba, as passed on to us by Shizuo Imaizumi, Shihan, founder of Shin-Budo Kai (SBK).

The thread of ASBK’s history as a martial arts dojo runs through a number of individuals who dedicated their time and resources to establish Aikido training opportunities in Albuquerque. We are particularly indebted to Wade Ishimoto Sensei, who was the first to offer Shin-Budo Kai style Aikido training in Albuquerque. Ishimoto Sensei began studying Aikido in 1965 in Hawaii and became a student of Imaizumi Sensei in 1982 after retiring from the United States Army Special Forces. With a martial arts background that includes judo, boxing, and Goju Ryu Karate-do, he is also noted for his contributions to combating terrorism. Ishimoto Sensei joined with Shizuo Imaizumi Shihan in October 1988 when Imaizumi Sensei established a network of Shin-Budo Kai dojos. Ishimoto Sensei remained as the only Shin-Budo Kai Aikido Chief Instructor in Albuquerque until his move to Washington, DC in 1996. Jim Redel Sensei, a student of Ishimoto Sensei, was a Shin-Budo Kai Aikido Chief Instructor here until his resignation in early 2006. In March of 2006, Imaizumi Sensei certified Ralph Bryan Sensei as a Chief Instructor of Shin-Budo Kai Aikido in Albuquerque. Albuquerque Shin-Budo Kai, Inc., a New Mexico nonprofit corporation, was formed in 2015 to continue Albuquerque’s long-standing legacy of providing education in Shin-Budo Kai Aikido instruction to the public.
 
Within Shin-Budo Kai, the arts of Aikido, Bokkendo (the way of the wooden sword), Jodo (the way of the short staff), and Genkido (the way of cultivating one’s body, mind and spirit through ki development) are the cornerstones of training. Training in Aikido forms the core, while genkido is foundational across all SBK arts. Practice in the use of the bokken and jo starts in the earliest stages of training.

We are a diverse group of aikidoka (aikido practitioners) that appreciates the camaraderie instilled by energetic, cooperative practice. During practice, safety and respect for others on the mat are among our highest priorities. Master Ueshiba taught that training in Aikido should always be conducted in a pleasant and joyful atmosphere. At Albuquerque Shin-Budo Kai, we try to embody this approach: we are a traditional dojo, but you will always hear laughter during our classes. We sincerely hope that you can feel this joy in practice as well.

As an Albuquerque Shin-Budo Kai student, you can expect to learn:

Aikido
Cooperative practice with a partner emphasizes self-defense techniques using wrist and arm immobilizations (katame waza) and throws (nage waza). The techniques are used in response to many different types of attacks such as wrist grabs, head strikes, punches, and knife attacks. The number of possible aikido techniques is virtually limitless, however beginners start by focusing on a core group of basic techniques. From this foundation, a student gradually builds up his or her "repertoire" and practice expands to include freestyle techniques (jiyu waza) and handling multiple attackers (randori).

Bokkendo/Jodo
At ASBK the terms 'bokkendo' and 'jodo' are used to describe our explorations of several styles of bokken (wooden sword) and jo (wooden staff) practice. Imaizumi Sensei has shared with us his experience with traditional forms of Japanese swordsmanship and jodo. We explore these forms by practicing kata (pre-arranged series of movements) derived by Imaizumi Sensei from traditional schools and from the direct teachings of the founder of Aikido, Morihei Ueshiba. As Aikido taijutsu (open-handed or 'weaponless' forms of self-defense) is derived in large part from stances and movements found in traditional (koryu) Japanese weapons systems, our study of bokkendo and jodo is essential to a comprehensive understanding of many of the technical aspects of Aikido. Weapons practice also serves to expand our appreciation for Japanese culture in general, and Budo in particular.

Our bokkendo and jodo curriculum, which is part of the overall certification and ranking system within Shin-Budo Kai, represents a unique blend of various classical training styles crafted specifically to complement Aikido training, and should not be confused with direct training in any one of those source arts. Our practice does not engage the official curriculum of any formal schools of jodo, kendo, or kenjutsu, and ASBK is not a certifying (rank-granting) organization for these traditional weapons systems.

Genkido
The concepts of genkido permeate all levels of instruction and include exercises that emphasize proper breathing (kokyuho), maintaining balance, and moving with mind-body coordination. Ki development exercises performed individually (hitori taiso) or in pairs (futari taiso) are practiced during every class. Genkido also includes the practice of misogi (from mi, meaning “body” and sogi, meaning “to purify”). At ASBK, misogi practices include cleaning/maintaining the dojo, breathing meditation, and group chanting.

You may also study:

Iaido
Beginning in 2011, ASBK also offers instruction in traditional Iaido – an optional opportunity open to ASBK Aikido students or to others who may wish to pursue Iaido alone. Iaido, which may be translated as 'the way of harmonizing oneself in action,' emphasizes a calm mind and precise movements while drawing, cutting, and resheathing an iaito (a metal Japanese practice sword). Like Aikido, Iaido is a form of traditional Japanese Budo. ASBK is privileged in that Oneman Otachi Lanham Shihan, current headmaster/guardian of the Otachi Ryu, has authorized Rodger Mayeda Sensei to teach Otachi Ryu Iaido at our dojo. While not part of the Shin-Budo Kai curriculum itself, the practice of Iaido is complementary to that of Aikido and its related arts. Through our partnership with Otachi Ryu, we offer yet another means by which our students may pursue the path of Budo.

Affiliated SBK Dojos:

       Albuquerque, NM      Bedford Hills, NY        Cornwall Bridge, CT        North Texas
       Durango CO             New York City, NY      Napa, CA


   
 
10500 Candelaria, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110     505-262-9383